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Change Management

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Review (Brooks Tanner)

Structure

What we strive for (reminder):

  • Visually appealing, well laid out, logical subheadings
  • Concise and to the point
  • Focused on the topic in question

Rating: 4 Stars

Comments:

Well laid out Concise Mostly focused, but the article tries to address both 1) how change management looks in a functioning Teal organization and 2) how an organization might change to Teal. I would suggest that the latter is a big topic and should be addressed elsewhere. In Practice: links do not work; even if they did, it would be easier for the reader to have the relevant text cut and pasted here so he wouldn’t have to search for it within the linked article.

Quality of Writing

What we strive for (reminder):

  • Coherent and logical flow throughout article
  • Written in a neutral and non judgmental tone
  • Well written - straightforward English and short sentences

Rating: 4 Stars

Comments:

Historical Perspective: Orange: Description seems to reflect a particular point of view and may be overly editorialized. “Change Management” in contemporary organizations is a vast and complex topic to try to summarize authoritatively here. FAQ: Does not sufficiently describe conditions under which the advice process can be suspended in crisis situations (may be best handled through an example).

Summary

4 Stars overall

Excellent overall


Review (Ken Everett)

Structure

What we strive for (reminder):

  • Visually appealing, well laid out, logical subheadings
  • Concise and to the point
  • Focused on the topic in question'

Rating: 4 Stars

Comments: More ‘white space’ would help the reader’s eye; e.g. in the Principles and Practices section…use more paragraphs. Make the links work, as pointed out by Brooks.

Quality of Writing

What we strive for (reminder):

  • Coherent and logical flow throughout article
  • Written in a neutral and non judgmental tone
  • Well written - straightforward English and short sentences'

Rating: 3.5 Stars

Comments: Shorter sentences are easy to achieve by (a) eliminating redundant words, and (b) breaking some into two. These will seduce, and keep, the reader’s attention.

Summary

3 Stars overall


Review (Charlie Efford)

Structure

What we strive for (reminder):

  • Visually appealing, well laid out, logical subheadings
  • Concise and to the point
  • Focused on the topic in question

Rating: 4 Stars

Comments:

Well laid out and organised. I agree with Brooks that attempting to describe how to make the transition to Teal could be better handled elsewhere. Otherwise the article focuses well on change management.

Quality of Writing

What we strive for (reminder):

  • Coherent and logical flow throughout article
  • Written in a neutral and non judgmental tone
  • Well written - straightforward English and short sentences

Rating: 4 Stars

Comments:

There is a good flow throughout the article and I found it easy to read. There are some long sentences that could be shortened without losing any meaning. At times I would have preferred some more tentative language. Some of the conclusions are reasonable but not definitive.

Summary

4 Stars overall

This is one of the better articles I have read and makes some good, well argued points. Any changes should be a low priority - with time and effort focused on other articles first.


Review (Ana Moreno)

Structure

What we strive for (reminder):

  • Visually appealing, well laid out, logical subheadings
  • Concise and to the point
  • Focused on the topic in question

Rating: 5  Stars

Comments:

In the definition it could be useful to anticipate the idea that in teal change management is not an issue.

In “planning only the first steps” could be relevant to reinforce the ideas of transcend and include stages.

Quality of Writing

What we strive for (reminder):

  • Coherent and logical flow throughout article
  • Written in a neutral and non judgmental tone
  • Well written - straightforward English and short sentences

Rating: 5 Stars

Comments:

5 Stars overall


Review (Mathias Holmgren)

Structure

What we strive for (reminder):

  • Visually appealing, well laid out, logical subheadings
  • Concise and to the point
  • Focused on the topic in question

Rating: 4(-) Stars

Comments:

Historical perspective, while standing out as being very well written, could benefit from being trimmed down to become more concise, as it is currently quite large compared to most other articles on the wiki.

Subheading issues

The selection of subheadings under the Principles and Practices diverge from most other articles in the wiki and to me this is a minus.

In most other articles they describe the name of a core teal principle that explains how teal orgs function. In this article they seem to be used as a form of narrative or only hinting at some areas of how teal deals with change. I would favor improving the subheadings so that they spell out what the principles are in the subheadings, if at all possible.

For example, none of these subheadings describe a principle or practice: Where to start, When sudden, drastic change is needed. These two are decent, but somewhat incomplete: Change on a continuous basis, Planning only the first step.

Idea: Change on a continuous basis (outcome) -> (by applying the principle of ...) Naturally responding as the need for change is sensed, with no delay, distributed and concurrent actions through the whole organization, by everyone. With less words. :)

Alternatively, Teal orgs does nothing to block - can not block - the change that people want to apply to their daily work every day. So all the need for change that builds up in conventional orgs for this reason is no longer created. So by not blocking healthy change anymore there is a lot less need for "change management" in the first place.

Idea: When sudden, drastic change is needed (narrative) -> Apply advice process and crisis management practices when large/sudden change is needed

NOTE: Possible new principle/paragraph/section: Tension driven change replaces Fear/Competition driven change (see below)

Quality of Writing

What we strive for (reminder):

  • Coherent and logical flow throughout article
  • Written in a neutral and non judgmental tone
  • Well written - straightforward English and short sentences

Rating: 4 Stars

Comments:

Overall well written and relatively easy to read.

Some paragraphs are a bit too long (big block of text) and could benefit from being broken up to improve readability.

Possible principles content improvements

About the change journey from traditional to teal org: As others here have mentioned that if this should be in this article at all, which I agree can be questioned, here is my feedback on it as is.

Can highlight the principle in self-trust, iterative change process and the concept of feedback. Borrowing from the Cynefin framework, implementation of Teal change management is at least complex, thus needs a sense/probe and respond strategy/plan itself. To me, explaining it in something like those terms would make it more clear and perhaps easier to explain/read (but probably need to be verified, could be just because I am familiar with those concepts).

Also, I think we somewhere in the article need to highlight - in the principles - that Teal orgs view the motive for change itself differently. While most conventional organizations want to change usually based on fear, Teal just views change as naturally happening when there is need - without much fear associated with change.

For example, most traditional organizations justify changing to compete better (or we lose market share), improve and become more efficient (or we lose money), improve our products (or they become obsolete). Either there is something threatening around the corner that is the underneath driver behind change. Or it is the wanting to threaten that drives change, for example we will change in this to threaten our competitors with our new product and drive market share.

When there is unfulfilled need in a Teal organization, that is aligned with the purpose of the organization, and that need is filled - go into that tension and feel it. There is no fear in that tension. There is something else that drives the willingness to take action, a different motive/driver. A willingness to deliver on that need, a desire to relieve that tension because it ... feels good and rewarding internally to do so and is a way of giving value that makes a difference.

Since Teal orgs are need/benefit/purpose driven, and use evolutionary purpose and self management, there thus is no coupling to fear/motive needed to "recruit" the energy needed to "drive" change. Instead, Teal orgs act on "tension". The fuel for driving change is either tension sensed individually, or tension harvested collectively (maybe that is a possible name for a category of practices, practices for harvesting collective/individual tensions).

So in a way, Teal orgs apply the principle of "Tension driven change", replacing the "Fear/Competition driven change" traditional paradigm.

At least, those are my thoughts on improved synthesis. If this makes sense to you, maybe that idea is something we can improve on.

Link to the three breakthroughs

Excellent.

FAQ

There may be more frequently asked questions.

In the the answer given, could also expose the hidden belief in the question: That the boss should be the decision maker and how that paradigm is fear driven, that if the boss does not take action then nothing will happen and the organization is doomed. Again, teal adopts a self trust in that the most of the change that is needed will happen if only we no longer stop it from happening naturally.

Summary

4 Stars overall

This is a well written article. Some things can be improved, such as creating subheadings that spell out what the teal principles are and possibly some elaboration of the "why"s of teal change management. Some paragraphs and sections can probably also be trimmed down or made even more clear. But all in all this is a strong article.